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Taking Back Sunday with Thursday, The New Regime and Colour Revolt

Revolution Live

Ft. Lauderdale, FL

July 9, 2011

 

When I read on online that Thursday was going on tour again, I was curious to see who they were going to tag along with this time. When I found out it was with the more punk relative Taking Back Sunday, I was excited beyond my mind.

Both bands have been around for more than ten years and both recently released new albums. Thursday’s No Devolucion transcends post hardcore and post rock into something that’s like Radiohead and The Cure mixed with old Thursday’s War All the Time album. Taking Back Sunday’s original band members’ recently released self-titled album is an evolution of their signature emo/post punk/hardcore sound. Other acts included The New Regime and Colour Revolt. I decided not to research the two openers prior to the show, hoping to bring a fresh perspective.

First up at Revolution was The New Regime. I found out the band’s front man, Ilan Rubin, was the touring drummer for Lost Prophets from 2006-2008 and was on their last album, The Betrayed. Rubin sings and plays the guitar for his newest project, which has a unique sound a bit like Wolfmother, but not as realized. Ironically enough, most new listeners seem to compare the group to NIN having a baby with Lost Prophets. It’s the same sound you hear from Sparta, or Filter, but with a small amount of alternative industrial rock thrown in. I definitely recommend checking this band out, their latest album Speak Through the White Noise was written by Rubin while on tour with NIN.

Next act, Colour Revolt, was a pleasant surprise; they weren’t the kind of band to get the pit growling and fist pumping but they were upbeat and aggressive. The movement on stage basically amounted to the guitar players walking around and occasionally hopping. Melodies were on point, and rough riffs were played and well received by the crowd. The band shattered expectations with some heavy and demanding songs. Colour Revolt felt like a faster, more complex version of Vast, Silverson Pickups or Abandoned Pools.

I can’t say much about Thursday that I haven’t said in previous articles. The group out of New Jersey never gets old and always delivers a great message albeit through different translations.

Honestly, this was one of the few shows where I’ve seen Thursday perform to a frantically screaming fan base. It was great to see Thursday play a more diverse set list, complete with “For the Work Force Drowning,” “Jet Black New Year” and their single offEmotions, “Magnets Caught in a Metal Heart.” The band mentioned that they are still continuing their anniversary tour in honor of Full Collapse before blinding the whole venue in white confetti. I can’t say much about Thursday that I haven’t said in previous articles. The group out of New Jersey never gets old and always delivers a great message albeit through different translations.

After the storm settled we found ourselves in the eye, cheering and chanting as the lights dimmed and the girls yelled “Taking Back Sunday!” or “Adam I love you!” TBS’s presence alone seemed to have been enough to promote the show. “El Paso,” their most aggressive song to date, kicked things off in violent fashion. The band kept things rolling with favorites, “Make Damn Sure” and “You Know How I Do.” During those songs, lead singer Adam Lazzara ran toward one side of the crowd, creating a spectacle for those close by.

After leaving the show to return my camera to the car, I got stuck near the backstage area watching the other artists listen to TBS perform some of my personal favorites such as, “One Eighty By Summer” and “Set Phasers to Stun.” My friends would later go on to bash me about what a great show I missed, but hey, it’s part of the job. At the end of the day I still got to listen and enjoy an awesome show.

Review and Photos by Juan Hernandez

 

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