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Struggling Veterans

The GI bill is supposed to help veterans, but lately it seems to only cause frustration. A change in the GI bill now forces veterans to apply to in-state schools if they want free tuition. This means that you can’t attend school in your home state if you’re listed as a resident in another. It also doesn’t help that some veteran students are being forced to pay an average of $10,000 of out-of-state tuition because of this change in the bill. The point of the change was to cut costs, but it ended up cutting opportunities for many.

Finding a way back to school is not their only worry. Many now face the stressful challenge of finding employment. Hundreds of resumes are sent out but no call backs are received. Needless to say, many are left with immense frustration. According to the US Labor Department, however, the veteran jobless rate is down to 10 percent and continues to get smaller.

To help them out, job fairs for veterans are being held across the country through the Hiring Our Heroes program. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the White House, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have all come together to create these fairs. They have also put the word out there that veterans should take advantage of the Post 9/11 GI Bill and the Veterans Retraining and Assistance Program to better prepare themselves for workforce.

Unfortunately, many feel that they are entitled to a job just because they served for the US. Some people believe that they will taken care of when they are out of the military, but those expectations are much too high. Most of the time they will have to do the work on their own. They will have to look for their own jobs and find their own way to graduate.

But of course, veterans are not the only ones having a difficult time. College students, single parents, older folks — everyone has been struggling.

Find out more about the GI Bill here.

 


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0 0 740 20 November, 2012 News November 20, 2012

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