Pink Tax Mania: A Global Issue

 

Some of you might be familiar with the term “Pink Tax,” some of you might not. However, it is something we should all be acquainted with. So the next time you have to purchase a personal hygiene product, you just don’t throw it in your shopping cart because it looks pretty in pink.

Here are somethings you should know: 

What isPink Tax?

The term refers to extra charges added to products or services targeted to women. Research shows that such products/services are tagged at a higher price for no logical. The New York City Department of Consumer Affairs asserts that females pay on average 13 percent more than males for personal care products and eight percent more for clothing.

Why pink?

Well, for centuries the color has been associated with femininity; therefore, when we think pink we think women. Unfortunately, companies use this marketing tactic to make more money off of females. Luckily in this 21st-century equality agenda color doesn’t have a gender, so it’s about time they start rethinking their ploy.

Is it legal?

Apparently, It is. Otherwise, we wouldn’t be having this conversation. There is no federal law that prevents merchants from charging women more than men. Nevertheless, federal agencies are  there to address concerns about gender discrimination through their anti-discrimination statutes. Having said this, speak up when you see an unfair price gap and make sure you file a complaint.

Did you know that some states have already eliminated the tax on pads and tampons?

Yes, that is correct, and Florida is one of them. In 2017 Gov. Rick Scott signed a bill that exempts taxes on the sale of feminine hygiene items.

If you live in a state that still allows this to happen, ask your local representative to put legislation on the table. If it’s already in the works, support it and make sure it becomes a reality.

Did you know that the Pink Tax mania is a global issue?

Yes, many countries around the world have been fighting this for years. Kenya was the first nation to win the battle back in 2004. India, Canada, and Malaysia have already eradicated this tax. Let’s keep going for more!

 

 

Did you know these items were categorized as “luxury” items instead of basic need items?

Yes, you heard right! Somebody decided that taking care of a natural cycle occurring in women every month was a luxury. For that reason, items that are categorized as feminine hygiene products are still taxed in many places. Women not only make less money than men, but they have to pay more for having their period.

What do women pay more for?

Unfortunately, the price discrepancy starts the moment we are conceived, and self-care items are not the only goods women have to pay more for. Maternity wear, toys, clothing, dry cleaning, haircuts, and even automobile repairs are subject to the gender-based pricing.

When it comes to maternity wear prices are exponentially raised for no reason. And the so-called plus-size section (a relatively new section for what we used to know as just XL/XXL or simply larger sizes) feels biased. There’s not much reliability in women’s fashion anymore, sizing varies from brand-to-brand and women, more often than not, end up paying more for needing a larger blouse.

Image Courtesy of CNBC

 

How can we get involved and be proactive? 

There are many ways to fight the broken and unjust system we live in.

  1. Utilizing social media, to make some noise and educate others, is a great way to start raising awareness. Let men the world know that women aren’t high maintenance; it just costs more to be one.
  2. Shopping in the men’s aisle is a more tangible way to hit the business’ revenue – stop paying extra for razor refills, shampoo, and pink bicycle helmets.
  3. Buying from companies that enforce price equality without compromising quality can make other companies surrender to the idea of price adjustment.

Now that you know how it works, take a moment to compare goods and start making smarter choices.

 

By Cynthia Paola Bautista


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